Stock Pots as a Canning Tool

Stock Pots

A Handy Tool to Aid in the Canning of Soups, Soup Stocks, and Stews


A stock pot can be one of the most versatile items you have in your kitchen. As the name implies, it is perfect for producing soup stocks, but it can also be used for preparing soups and stews, cooking pasta, boiling corn on the cob, braising meats, making marinara sauces and much more. Larger than your customary pots and pans, it is this larger size that lends it its versatility.

Since soup stock is generally prepared for use in future meals, many recipes suggest separating the large batch that results into smaller portions. Some of these could be refrigerated for more immediate use, and others frozen for use at more distant meal times. One home chef recommends that the freezing take place in ice cube trays with the frozen cubes being taken out and stored in plastic freezer bags for space saving convenience. Freezing, however, need not be the only option. Canning is also a possibility.

Of course, canning, if chosen, needs to be done properly. Water bath and steam canners work, but they may not work safely. The best choice, when it comes to the canning of such non-acidic foods as meats and many vegetables, is pressure canning. This effectively destroys those organisms which cannot be totally eliminated when relying solely upon boiling water methods.

And how can this be done?

Recipes abound.  Here is one taken from Kitchen Savy, a popular site for answering food and cooking questions:


Canning Stocks and Soups

You can definitely can beef and chicken stocks. Most current reference materials have recipes for canning stock. Essentially the method is to make the stock by placing the meat bones or chicken carcasses in a large enough stockpot, covering them with water and bringing to a boil. Always use fresh ingredients. Place a cover on the pot and simmer meat bones for 3 to four hours, or chicken carcasses for 30-45 minutes. Strain and cool the broth until the fat can be easily removed.

My favorite method is to cool the stock until the fat solidifies and can be easily lifted off with a slotted spoon. Reheat the broth to boiling; fill sterile canning jars, leaving a 1 inch (2.5 cm) headspace, and process using a pressure canner, remembering to adjust processing times for altitude.

Meat removed from the bones or carcasses can be added back to the broth before boiling, but be sure to remove as much fat as possible before doing so. Also, if you are using the meat, keep it refrigerated until you are ready to add it back.
Canning soup is a little more difficult. Noodles or other pasta may overcook and turn to mush or dissolve completely during processing and so many sources recommend not using them. Fresh or leftover pasta can always be added during reheating. The same applies to rice. Flour, cream, milk or other thickening agents should not be added to home canned soups.

To make and can soups, make broth as for canning above, and wash, peel and cook the vegetables as you would if you were canning them. Consult the canning recipes for the individual vegetables for instructions and cooking times.

If dried beans or peas are used, they need to be fully rehydrated first. This can be done using the quick soak method. After quick soaking, they should be returned to the boil, drained, added to the liquid ingredients and boiled for a further 5 minutes.

To process, fill sterilized canning jars no more than half full of solids, and then cover with the liquids, leaving a 1 inch (2.5 cm) headspace. Process using a pressure canner, again remembering to adjust for altitude.

More tender vegetables like some varieties of peas that may not can well can be added from frozen when the soup is heated for serving.

Some recipes can be found for spaghetti and other sauces. Since these contain both high and low acid foods, they must be treated as if they were low acid using pressure canning techniques.


It needs to be remembered, of course, that this same stock pot can, as mentioned, also serve as a useful tool in the canning of other dishes such as sauces and stews.  They are a great device for preparing such foods in larger batches.

For More Food and Cooking Questions

For More Food and Cooking Questions


Get Started

View the Storeitfoods' Product Assortment


Click here to view a complete summary of the many products carried at StoreitFoods.com. 



Search Storeitfoods.com

Search Storeitfoods.com



Storeitfoods.com

Site Map

Site Map

Cart

Cart

Items: 0
Subtotal: $0.00
Note: All prices in US Dollars


Meet the Manufacturers

Meet the Manufacturers

The Reference Room

The Reference Room

Recent Product Additions

Recent Product Additions

Stock Pots
About Us  ·  Return Policy  ·  FAQs  ·  PayPal  ·  Privacy Policy  ·  Shipping / Returns
Copyright © Garilyn Enterprises. Brandon, Manitoba
mailto:support@storeitfoods.com